What Is PAR And How Does It Affect My Cannabis Plants?

What Is PAR And How Does It Affect My Cannabis Plants?

What Is PAR And How Does It Affect My Cannabis Plants?

PAR stands for Photosynthetically Active Radiation, which refers to the range of light wavelengths that plants use for photosynthesis. PAR is typically measured in units of micromoles per second per square meter (µmol/s/m²) and is an important consideration when selecting grow lights for cannabis cultivation.

The PAR range includes wavelengths of light that fall within the visible spectrum, specifically between 400 and 700 nanometers (nm). This range includes blue light (400-500 nm) and red light (600-700 nm), which are particularly important for plant growth and development.

When selecting grow lights for cannabis cultivation, it is important to choose lights that provide a sufficient amount of PAR for the plants. Growers can use PAR meters or spectrometers to measure the amount of PAR being emitted by their grow lights.

It is important to note that different stages of cannabis growth require different levels of PAR. During the vegetative stage, plants require higher levels of PAR to encourage growth and development, while during the flowering stage, plants require lower levels of PAR to encourage the production of buds.

Additionally, the type of grow light being used can affect the amount of PAR emitted. LED grow lights are a popular choice for cannabis cultivation because they can be tuned to emit specific wavelengths of light, including those within the PAR range. High-pressure sodium (HPS) lights are also commonly used, but they emit a wider range of wavelengths, including some that are not within the PAR range.

In summary, PAR refers to the range of light wavelengths that plants use for photosynthesis, including blue and red light. Cannabis growers should select grow lights that emit sufficient levels of PAR for their plants, and adjust the PAR levels as needed during different stages of growth. Grow lights such as LED grow lights can be tuned to emit specific wavelengths of light within the PAR range, while HPS lights emit a wider range of wavelengths.


Search our blog:

Further Reading:

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: